Using Technology to Support Postsecondary Student Learning

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IES PRACTICE GUIDE,Using Technology to Support Postsecondary. Student Learning,PANEL STAFF,Nada Dabbagh Chair Sarah Costelloe. George Mason University Kristen Cummings,Randall Bass Brian Freeman. Georgetown University Michael Frye,Allan Porowski,Sandra Jo Wilson. University System of Maryland,Abt Associates,Anthony G Picciano.
City University of New York PROJECT OFFICERS,Jennifer Sparrow Felicia Sanders. Pennsylvania State University Christopher Weiss,Institute of Education Sciences. WWC 20090001,U S DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, This report was prepared for the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance Institute of. Education Sciences under the What Works Clearinghouse Postsecondary Education Postsecondary Preparation. and Evidence Reporting WWC PEPPER contract to Abt Associates Contract ED IES 16 C 0024. DISCLAIMER, The opinions and positions expressed in this practice guide are those of the authors and do not necessarily. represent the opinions and positions of the Institute of Education Sciences or the U S Department of Education. This practice guide should be reviewed and applied according to the specifc needs of the educators and. education agency using it and with full realization that it represents the judgments of the review panel regarding. what constitutes sensible practice based on the research that was available at the time of publication This practice. guide should be used as a tool to assist in decision making rather than as a cookbook Any references within the. document to specifc education products are illustrative and do not imply endorsement of these products to the. exclusion of other products that are not referenced. U S DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,Betsy DeVos,INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES.
Mark Schneider, NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION EVALUATION AND REGIONAL ASSISTANCE. Matthew Soldner,Commissioner, This report is in the public domain Although permission to reprint this publication is not necessary the citation. should be as follows, Dabbagh N Bass R Bishop M Costelloe S Cummings K Freeman B Frye M Picciano A G Porowski A. Sparrow J Wilson S J 2019 Using technology to support postsecondary student learning A practice guide for. college and university administrators advisors and faculty Washington DC Institute of Education Sciences What. Works Clearinghouse WWC 20090001 Washington DC National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional. Assistance NCEE Institute of Education Sciences U S Department of Education https whatworks ed gov. The citation for this What Works Clearinghouse practice guide begins with the panel chair followed by the names. of the panelists and staf listed in alphabetical order. This report is available on the IES website at http whatworks ed gov. ALTERNATE FORMATS, On request this publication can be made available in alternate formats such as Braille large print or CD For more. information contact the Alternate Format Center at 202 260 0852 or 202 260 0818. Table Of Contents, Introduction to the Practice Guide on Using Technology to Support Postsecondary.
Student Learning 1, Recommendation 1 Use communication and collaboration tools to increase interaction. among students and between students and instructors 5. Recommendation 2 Use varied personalized and readily available digital resources. to design and deliver instructional content 14, Recommendation 3 Incorporate technology that models and fosters self regulated. learning strategies 26, Recommendation 4 Use technology to provide timely and targeted feedback on. student performance 38, Recommendation 5 Use simulation technologies that help students engage in complex. problem solving 47,Glossary 53, Appendix A Postscript From the Institute of Education Sciences 56.
Appendix B Methods and Processes for Developing This Practice Guide 60. Appendix C Rationale for Evidence Ratings 63,Appendix D About the Authors 89. Appendix E Disclosure of Potential Conficts of Interest 93. References 94,LIST OF BOXES,Box 1 Study eligibility criteria 1. Box 2 Levels of evidence 2,LIST OF TABLES, Table 1 Recommendations and corresponding levels of evidence 2. Table A 1 IES levels of evidence for What Works Clearinghouse practice guides 58. Table C 1 Studies providing evidence for Recommendation 1 Use communication and. collaboration tools to increase interaction among students and between students and instructors 66. Table C 2 Studies providing evidence for Recommendation 2 Use varied personalized. and readily available digital resources to design and deliver instructional content 70. Table C 3 Studies providing evidence for Recommendation 3 Incorporate technology. that models and fosters self regulated learning strategies 79. Table C 4 Studies providing evidence for Recommendation 4 Use technology to. provide timely and targeted feedback on student performance 83. Table C 5 Study providing evidence for Recommendation 5 Use simulation. technologies that help students engage in complex problem solving 88. LIST OF FIGURES, Figure 1 1 Features of a sample mobile app that supports communication and. collaboration Schools App 7, Figure 1 2 Sample student guidelines for interacting online and protecting privacy 9.
Figure 1 3 Example of a tool that supports selection of instructional technology. Tech Select Decision Aide 11, Figure 1 4 EDUCAUSE s 7 Things You Should Know About series 12. Figure 2 1 The ADDIE Model A sample framework for developing courses 17. Figure 2 2 Sample checklist for planning online education 18. Figure 2 3 Sample toolkit for evaluating digital learning interventions Practical Evaluation. for Digital Learning PEDL 21, Figure 2 4 Sample repository of open educational resources MERLOT Multimedia. Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching 23. Figure 2 5 Sample Open Learning Initiative OLI learning dashboard 24. Figure 2 6 Sample tool to guide selection of technology Pedagogy First 25. Figure 3 1 Example of interactive interface to support students use of self regulated. learning strategies 28, Figure 3 2 Sample text based reminders and prompts to support self regulated learning 30. Figure 3 3 Sample individualized email based on student goals and performance 31. Figure 3 4 Example of campus resources to support self regulated learning 32. Figure 3 5 Sample training model to support self regulation through learning technologies 33. Figure 3 6 Example of adaptive learning environment with pedagogical agents to. support self regulated learning 35, Figure 3 7 Sample tool for students to monitor progress Check My Activity 36. Figure 4 1 Sample classroom polling tool Poll Everywhere 41. Figure 4 2 Sample classroom response system Plickers 41. Figure 4 3 Types of questions that can be used with classroom response systems 43. Figure 4 4 Example design tactics for creating clicker questions 44. Figure 5 1 Sample online simulation tool California Budget Challenge 49. Figure 5 2 Sample tips for group problem based learning assignments using. immersive technology 50, Figure B 1 Studies identifed screened and reviewed for practice guide 61.
INTRODUCTION,Introduction to the Practice Guide on Using. Technology to Support Postsecondary Student Learning. Despite increasing college enrollment1 and growing active and engaging learning available throughout. diversity of the college student population 2 college institutional oferings and help students become. completion rates are low Less than a quarter of more successful learners. students enrolled at public 2 year institutions, complete their programs within 3 years 3 At 4 year This practice guide developed by the What. institutions only 58 percent of students who enroll Works Clearinghouse WWC in conjunction. at public institutions and 69 percent of students with an expert panel focuses on promising. who enroll at private institutions complete their uses of technologies associated with improving. programs at any institution within 6 years 4 The frst postsecondary student learning outcomes It. year of college is critical with about 20 percent of provides higher education instructors instructional. frst time full time students in 4 year institutions and designers administrators and other staf with. more than 40 percent of frst time full time students specifc recommendations for supporting learning. in 2 year institutions failing to return to that same through the efective use of technology. institution for their second year 5 Persistence and. graduation rates are even lower for frst generation Using Evidence to Develop the. low income and racial ethnic minority college Recommendations. students 6,This practice guide makes fve evidence,based recommendations around how to use. See the Glossary for a full list of key terms used technology to support postsecondary learning. in this guide and their defnitions These terms are. Each recommendation includes examples of,underlined when frst introduced in the guide. technologies and how to implement them advice,on how to overcome potential obstacles and a.
Many colleges are exploring ways to leverage summary of the research evidence that supports. technology to improve student retention and the recommendation The panel created a practice. increase the educational options for and success of guide protocol to guide the evidence search and. their diverse student bodies Technology is infused review 11 Findings from eligible studies see Box 1. in almost every aspect of college life In the general that meet evidence standards were summarized. population 77 of individuals own a smartphone by trained and certifed WWC reviewers for. 73 own a laptop or personal computer and 53 consideration by the expert panel. own a tablet 7 Mirroring that trend students have, increasingly greater access to personal computing BOX 1 STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA. and communications technologies 8 Web based Eligible research used a comparison group design. course or learning management systems and included an intervention that used technology to. instructional technology centers can be found on support student learning involved college students. almost every U S college campus Colleges are even in the United States was published in 1997 or later. ranked based on the quality of their technology and reported on one or more outcomes in the. following domains 1 academic achievement 2,infrastructure and connectivity 9 Of campus. college attendance 3 credit accumulation and, technology allowed more than six million college persistence 4 attainment of a degree certifcate or. students to take online courses in the 2015 2016 credential 5 post college employment and income. school year 10 Colleges are using technology to or 6 student engagement and motivation. improve the quality of student learning make, USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT POSTSECONDARY STUDENT LEARNING INTRODUCTION 1. INTRODUCTION, The expert panel after considering the evidence Overarching Themes.
drafted the recommendations and assigned a level,Each recommendation focuses on using technology. of evidence to each see Box 2,to support particular aspects of student learning. Taken together the recommendations highlight fve, BOX 2 LEVELS OF EVIDENCE themes that cut across all of the advice in this guide. Strong There is consistent evidence that meets,WWC standards and indicates that the practices. Focus on how technology is used not on the, improve student outcomes for a diverse population technology itself Technology evolves rapidly.
of students Many of the technologies used in the research. Moderate There is some evidence meeting WWC that supports this guide could change in the near. standards that the practices improve student future Thus the expert panel elected to focus on. outcomes but there may be ambiguity about how technology can be used to enhance and. whether that improvement is the direct result of the support teaching and learning Keep this in mind. practices or whether the fndings can be replicated throughout the guide the specifc technologies. with a diverse population of students,are less important than the ways existing or. Minimal Evidence may not meet standards or may emerging technologies can be used efectively in. exhibit inconsistencies but the panel determined college settings both now and in the future. that the recommendation must be included because, the intervention is based on strong theory is new Technology should be aligned to specifc. and has not yet been studied or is difcult to study learning goals Every recommendation in. with a rigorous research design this guide is based on one idea fnding ways. to use technology to engage students and, The recommendations and the panel s strength of enhance their learning experiences That is the. evidence assessment are shown in Table 1 below focus of this guide is not on using technology. Table 1 Recommendations and corresponding levels of evidence. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE,Practice Recommendation Minimal Moderate Strong. 1 Use communication and collaboration tools to increase interaction. among students and between students and instructors. 2 Use varied personalized and readily available digital resources to. design and deliver instructional content, 3 Incorporate technology that models and fosters self regulated.
learning strategies, 4 Use technology to provide timely and targeted feedback on student. performance, 5 Use simulation technologies that help students engage in complex. Sparrow J amp Wilson S J 2019 Using technology to support postsecondary student learning A practice guide for college and university administrators advisors and faculty Washington DC Institute of Education Sciences What WWC 20090001 Washington DC National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional

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