Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Road Safety At

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2,The Basics, Understanding key terms will help you apply processes and tools in this section . A hazard is a thing or condition that can expose a person to risk of injury or occupational disease It s. any potential source of harm damage or adverse health effects However MVIs have sweeping. consequences beyond personal injury For road safety purposes we also need to think of hazards in. terms of exposing people and organizations to other significant losses property damage business. interruption and reputation damage and environmental harm . Our approach to driving related hazards, Using a somewhat narrow traditional approach the primary hazard or source of harm that we seek to. eliminate is the motor vehicle incident Certainly there are driving related hazards that do not involve a. crash Improper seating positions that cause musculo skeletal injuries the mental toll of intensely. challenging road conditions physical violence by a passenger or being stranded by a vehicle break . down in extreme weather are a few These are surely hazards to address However the greatest single. source of harm associated with driving is the energy unleashed during a crash . Unfortunately applying a traditional understanding of hazard does not work very well for motor vehicle. incidents It is difficult to complete a meaningful risk assessment of a singular yet vastly complex . hazard such as a crash To get risk assessment results that you can readily use to build your action plan . you need to dig a little deeper and look closely at the things conditions circumstances actions and. inactions the factors that can cause or contribute to a crash . Therefore our approach to driving related hazards includes conditions and circumstances that a. traditional approach would classify as contributing factors or risk factors . Types of driving related hazards include ,1 Physical. objects a sharp rock wildlife worn tire or faulty brake. substances carbon monoxide drugs alcohol fuel and hazardous fluids in or on a vehicle. materials gravel road surface ice, temperature extreme weather temperatures contacting a hot surface. 2 Energy, kinetic an oncoming vehicle the speed of the vehicle you are in.
gravity car falling off jack during tire change, electrical shock from an incorrect jumper cable connection. noise prolonged exposure to a loud exhaust system. pressure compressed air or hydraulic fluid, The information contained in this document is for educational purposes only It is not intended to provide legal or other advice to you . and you should not rely upon the information to provide any such advice We believe the information provided is accurate and complete . however we do not provide any warranty express or implied of its accuracy or completeness Neither WorkSafeBC nor the Justice. Institute of British Columbia nor Road Safety at Work shall be liable in any manner or to any extent for any direct indirect special . incidental or consequential damages losses or expenses arising out of the use of this form February 2016. 3, 3 Conditions processes and practices, conditions fatigued driver poor traction insufficient lighting or visibility stressful driving. circumstances such as heavy traffic or aggressive drivers . processes insufficient driver training lack of vehicle inspections or maintenance. practices overloading vehicle high risk driving behaviours such as speeding following too. close or texting while driving poor ergonomics such as improperly adjusted seat . Risk is the possibility or potential for loss Losses incurred by MVIs can include physical and. psychological injuries to workers and others costs of repairing or replacing damaged property and. impacts to business processes e g lost productivity reputation and the environment Three factors. determine how much risk is associated with a given hazard . Frequency of Exposure how often and for how long workers are exposed to the hazard . Probability of Occurrence the likelihood that a MVI or other incident will occur . Severity of Consequences the magnitude of loss negative consequences or impacts . The following formula explains risk , Risk Exposure x Probability x Severity. Tip In the risk equation implementing measures that make any one of the variables zero also makes. the risk zero For example if no worker is exposed to a hazard exposure equals zero and risk is zero . Find other helpful terms and definitions in our Glossary . The information contained in this document is for educational purposes only It is not intended to provide legal or other advice to you . and you should not rely upon the information to provide any such advice We believe the information provided is accurate and complete . however we do not provide any warranty express or implied of its accuracy or completeness Neither WorkSafeBC nor the Justice. Institute of British Columbia nor Road Safety at Work shall be liable in any manner or to any extent for any direct indirect special . incidental or consequential damages losses or expenses arising out of the use of this form February 2016. 4,Hazard Identification, Hazard identification involves looking for things conditions and practices in your employees driving.
environments that have potential to cause or contribute to a crash and identifying the people who may. be exposed to those hazards ,Hints for Identifying Hazards. If you are not familiar with all the hazards your drivers face try the following . 1 Speak with the drivers What practices locations or situations do they consider dangerous . 2 Go for a ride along Experience the conditions and circumstances your drivers encounter . 3 Check vehicle inspection reports What mechanical issues do you see or hear about . 4 Review near miss reports and incident investigations What caused or contributed to those events . 5 Check a vehicle owner s manual Review the operating instructions and watch for Caution labels. and Hazard symbols , 6 Think about non routine and high risk driving circumstances What dangers are there . 7 Talk with other employers What are their biggest road safety challenges . 8 Who could be harmed Usually we think about injuries to the driver Who else could be harmed . their passenger s other motorists pedestrians or cyclists . Tip Effective hazard identification is a team effort Involve your employees supervisors managers. and especially the employees that drive for work They know the hazards they face and which ones. are of greatest concern They also have good ideas on how to manage the risks . Use a Systematic Approach, Driving is complex Drivers operate vehicles in a wide range of circumstances and conditions . Environments change so do the drivers vehicles and hazards Use a step by step approach to identify. and keep track of hazards , Tip It s effective to identify and organize hazards in terms of the driver the vehicle and the journey . The Road Hazard Inventory, Your organization might already have an effective method to identify and classify workplace hazards If.
you do apply it to road safety If not have a look at the Road Hazard Inventory This worksheet lists. many of the road safety hazards and categorizes them by driver vehicle and journey . To build your own Road Hazard Inventory select the hazards that apply to your workplaces and drivers . Modify descriptions so they accurately reflect hazards in the driving environments your employees. encounter Add hazards or factors that aren t there Rather than deleting hazards that don t apply . simply strike through them Even though that hazard may not currently be present in your workplace it. might be the next time you review your hazard inventory . The information contained in this document is for educational purposes only It is not intended to provide legal or other advice to you . and you should not rely upon the information to provide any such advice We believe the information provided is accurate and complete . however we do not provide any warranty express or implied of its accuracy or completeness Neither WorkSafeBC nor the Justice. Institute of British Columbia nor Road Safety at Work shall be liable in any manner or to any extent for any direct indirect special . incidental or consequential damages losses or expenses arising out of the use of this form February 2016. 5,Risk Assessment, Once you have an inventory of driving related hazards the next step is a risk assessment in which you. estimate or calculate how much risk each hazard presents There are two common approaches . Qualitative methods classify risks based on descriptions of frequency and severity criteria Qualitative. methods are subjective and usually assign relative risk rankings such as low medium high or extreme . Quantitative methods are objective and place greater reliance on numerical data and statistics or. records to score frequency of exposure probability of occurrence and severity of impacts and. calculate individual risk scores , Risk assessments using either method should take full advantage of relevant direct observations and. records how often certain types of crashes have occurred how frequently specific hazards have. contributed to crashes which vehicle types which drivers which locations as well as the nature and. magnitude of consequences However because risk assessments are forward looking procedures. seeking to anticipate risks and prevent MVIs many organizations don t have enough data to use purely. quantitative methods to assess road safety risks , Even when your risk assessment incorporates industry data or incident information from employers. engaged in the same type of work it can be difficult to gather reliable representative numbers for each. hazard Usually evaluating road safety risks requires that assessors also apply their qualified estimate or. informed best guess in a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods . Sections below demonstrate two such hybrid methods . Simple Risk Matrix is a 3 x 3 matrix that uses qualitative descriptions and comparative ranges. of values to rank risks as high medium or low , Quantified Risk Scale has three risk variables and applies more precise qualitative criteria as. well as specific values to calculate individual risk scores . Method One Simple Risk Matrix, The simple risk matrix in Table One relies on probability and severity scores of high medium or low to.
assign relative risk rankings The color coding in the matrix provides you with a visual sense of the. relative priority attached to that hazard , Table Two provides comparative criteria or descriptors to help determine the probability and severity. associated with each hazard The outputs of Table Two are the inputs for Table One . The information contained in this document is for educational purposes only It is not intended to provide legal or other advice to you . and you should not rely upon the information to provide any such advice We believe the information provided is accurate and complete . however we do not provide any warranty express or implied of its accuracy or completeness Neither WorkSafeBC nor the Justice. Institute of British Columbia nor Road Safety at Work shall be liable in any manner or to any extent for any direct indirect special . incidental or consequential damages losses or expenses arising out of the use of this form February 2016. 6,Table One Simple Risk Matrix, HIGH,Severity MEDIUM. LOW, LOW MEDIUM HIGH, Probability, Table Two Simple Risk Matrix Assessment Descriptors. Rating Probability Severity, Frequent or repeated event Serious or disabling personal injury . permanent disability or fatality, Occurs at least once a year in the.
organization Costs to repair replace property, damage greater than 100 000. Occurs several times during a project,High, Loss of business function for. Occurs often in similar circumstances e g in, extended period substantial. another company that does work similar to, consequences for business. yours , Greater than 50 chance of occurring, Event is known to occur but not frequently Injury requiring medical aid with or.
without lost time from work, Occurs less than once a year in organization. Costs to repair replace property, Has occurred in similar circumstances e g . Medium damage 25 000 100 000, in another company that does work similar. to yours Loss of business function for short, period modest consequences for. 10 to 50 chance of occurring, business, Unlikely event has not occurred in your No injury or minor injury requiring.
company but could happen first aid, Low May happen once in 10 years Costs to repair replace property. damage less than 25 000, Has never been observed but possible. Minor business interruption, Less than 10 chance of occurring. The information contained in this document is for educational purposes only It is not intended to provide legal or other advice to you . and you should not rely upon the information to provide any such advice We believe the information provided is accurate and complete . however we do not provide any warranty express or implied of its accuracy or completeness Neither WorkSafeBC nor the Justice. Institute of British Columbia nor Road Safety at Work shall be liable in any manner or to any extent for any direct indirect special . incidental or consequential damages losses or expenses arising out of the use of this form February 2016

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