FIFTY FAMOUS STORIES RETOLD Yesterday s Classics

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FIFTY FAMOUS,STORIES RETOLD,JAMES BALDWIN,YESTERDAY S CLASSICS. CHAPEL HILL NORTH CAROLINA,Cover and arrangement 2005 Yesterday s Classics. This edition first published in 2005 by,Yesterday s Classics is an unabridged. republication of the work originally published by,American Book Company in 1896 For a listing. of books published by Yesterday s Classics please,visit www yesterdaysclassics com Yesterday s.
Classics is the publishing arm of the Baldwin,Project which presents the complete text of. dozens of classic books for children at,www mainlesson com under the editorship of Lisa. M Ripperton and T A Roth,ISBN 10 1 59915 006 9,ISBN 13 978 1 59915 006 2. Yesterday s Classics,PO Box 3418,Chapel Hill NC 27515. KING ALFRED AND THE CAKES 1,KING ALFRED AND THE BEGGAR 4.
KING CANUTE ON THE SEASHORE 7,THE SONS OF WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR 11. THE WHITE SHIP 15,KING JOHN AND THE ABBOT 19,A STORY OF ROBIN HOOD 26. BRUCE AND THE SPIDER 32,THE BLACK DOUGLAS 34,THREE MEN OF GOTHAM 38. OTHER WISE MEN OF GOTHAM 41,THE MILLER OF THE DEE 46. SIR PHILIP SIDNEY 49,THE UNGRATEFUL SOLDIER 51,SIR HUMPHREY GILBERT 54.
SIR WALTER RALEIGH 56,POCAHONTAS 60,GEORGE WASHINGTON AND HIS HATCHET 62. GRACE DARLING 65,THE STORY OF WILLIAM TELL 68,ARNOLD WINKELRIED 71. THE BELL OF ATRI 74,HOW NAPOLEON CROSSED THE ALPS 81. THE STORY OF CINCINNATUS 83,THE STORY OF REGULUS 88. CORNELIA S JEWELS 91,ANDROCLUS AND THE LION 94,HORATIUS AT THE BRIDGE 98.
JULIUS C SAR 102,THE SWORD OF DAMOCLES 104,DAMON AND PYTHIAS 108. A LACONIC ANSWER 111,THE UNGRATEFUL GUEST 113,ALEXANDER AND BUCEPHALUS 116. DIOGENES THE WISE MAN 119,THE BRAVE THREE HUNDRED 122. SOCRATES AND HIS HOUSE 124,THE KING AND HIS HAWK 125. DOCTOR GOLDSMITH 130,THE KINGDOMS 132,THE BARMECIDE FEAST 136.
THE ENDLESS TALE 140,THE BLIND MEN AND THE ELEPHANT 143. MAXIMILIAN AND THE GOOSE BOY 145,THE INCHCAPE ROCK 151. WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT 154,CASABIANCA 167,ANTONIO CANOVA 170. PICCIOLA 176,MIGNON 181,CONCERNING THESE STORIES,THERE are numerous time honored stories which. have become so incorporated into the literature and. thought of our race that a knowledge of them is an. indispensable part of one s education These stories. are of several different classes To one class belong. the popular fairy tales which have delighted untold. generations of children and will continue to delight. them to the end of time To another class belong the. limited number of fables that have come down to us. through many channels from hoar antiquity To a, third belong the charming stories of olden times that.
are derived from the literatures of ancient peoples. such as the Greeks and the Hebrews A fourth class, includes the half legendary tales of a distinctly later. origin which have for their subjects certain romantic. episodes in the lives of well known heroes and,famous men or in the history of a people. It is to this last class that most of the fifty, stories contained in the present volume belong As a. matter of course some of these stories are better,known and therefore more famous than others. Some have a slight historical value some are useful. as giving point to certain great moral truths others. are products solely of the fancy and are intended,only to amuse Some are derived from very ancient.
sources and are current in the literature of many, lands some have come to us through the ballads and. folk tales of the English people a few are of quite. recent origin nearly all are the subjects of frequent. allusions in poetry and prose and in the conversation. of educated people Care has been taken to exclude, everything that is not strictly within the limits of. probability hence there is here no trespassing upon. the domain of the fairy tale the fable or the myth. That children naturally take a deep interest in, such stories no person can deny that the reading of. them will not only give pleasure but will help to lay. the foundation for broader literary studies can, scarcely be doubted It is believed therefore that the. present collection will be found to possess all,educative value which will commend it as a.
supplementary reader in the middle primary grades, at school It is also hoped that the book will prove. so attractive that it will be in demand out of school. as well as in,Acknowledgments are due to Mrs Charles A. Lane by whom eight or ten of the stories were,KING ALFRED AND THE. MANY years ago there lived in England a wise,and good king whose name was Alfred No other. man ever did so much for his country as he and,people now all over the world speak of him as.
Alfred the Great,In those days a king did not have a very easy. life There was war almost all the time and no one, else could lead his army into battle so well as he. And so between ruling and fighting he had a busy,time of it indeed. A fierce rude people called the Danes had,come from over the sea and were fighting the. English There were so many of them and they were, so bold and strong that for a long time they gained.
every battle If they kept on they would soon be the. masters of the whole country,At last after a great battle the English army. was broken up and scattered Every man had to save,himself in the best way he could King Alfred fled. alone in great haste through the woods and,FIFTY FAMOUS STORIES RETOLD. Late in the day the king came to the hut of a,woodcutter He was very tired and hungry and he. begged the woodcutter s wife to give him something. to eat and a place to sleep in her hut,The woman was baking some cakes upon the.
hearth and she looked with pity upon the poor,ragged fellow who seemed so hungry She had no. thought that he was the king,Yes she said I will give you some supper. if you will watch these cakes I want to go out and. milk the cow and you must see that they do not,burn while I am gone. King Alfred was very willing to watch the, cakes but he had far greater things to think about. How was he going to get his army together again, And how was he going to drive the fierce Danes out.
of the land He forgot his hunger he forgot the, cakes he forgot that he was in the woodcutter s hut. His mind was busy making plans for to morrow,In a little while the woman came back The. cakes were smoking on the hearth They were,burned to a crisp Ah how angry she was. You lazy fellow she cried See what you,have done You want something to eat but you do. not want to work,I have been told that she even struck the king.
with a stick but I can hardly believe that she was so. ill natured,KING ALFRED AND THE CAKES,The king must have laughed to himself at the. thought of being scolded in this way and he was so. hungry that he did not mind the woman s angry,words half so much as the loss of the cakes. I do not know whether he had anything to eat,that night or whether he had to go to bed without. his supper But it was not many days until he had, gathered his men together again and had beaten the. Danes in a great battle,KING ALFRED AND THE,AT one time the Danes drove King Alfred.
from his kingdom and he had to lie hidden for a,long time on a little island in a river. One day all who were on the island except,the king and queen and one servant went out to. fish It was a very lonely place and no one could get. to it except by a boat About noon a ragged beggar,came to the king s door and asked for food. The king called the servant and asked How,much food have we in the house. My lord said the servant we have only,one loaf and a little wine.
Then the king gave thanks to God and said, Give half of the loaf and half of the wine to this. The servant did as he was bidden The beggar,thanked the king for his kindness and went on his. In the afternoon the men who had gone out, to fish came back They had three boats full of fish. KING ALFRED AND THE BEGGAR,and they said We have caught more fish to day. than in all the other days that we have been on this. The king was glad and he and his people were,more hopeful than they had ever been before.
When night came the king lay awake for a,long time and thought about the things that had. happened that day At last he fancied that he saw a. great light like the sun and in the midst of the light. there stood an old man with black hair holding an,open book in his hand. It may all have been a dream and yet to the,king it seemed very real indeed He looked and. wondered but was not afraid,Who are you he asked of the old man. Alfred my son be brave said the man for, I am the one to whom you gave this day the half of.
all the food that you had Be strong and joyful of, heart and listen to what I say Rise up early in the. morning and blow your horn three times so loudly,that the Danes may hear it By nine o clock five. hundred men will be around you ready to be led into. battle Go forth bravely and within seven days your. enemies shall be beaten and you shall go back to,your kingdom to reign in peace. Then the light went out and the man was,seen no more. In the morning the king arose early and, crossed over to the mainland Then he blew his horn.
the popular fairy tales which have delighted untold generations of children and will continue to delight them to the end of time To another class belong the limited number of fables that have come down to us through many channels from hoar antiquity To a third belong the charming stories of olden times that are derived from the literatures of ancient peoples such as the Greeks and the

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